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NHL Rumor Wire – May 11th, 2011

The Phoneix Coyotes are staying in Phoenix for the 2011-12 season, thanks to a vote by Glendale City Council.

From Coyotes Press Release

GLENDALE, AZ – “On behalf of the entire Phoenix Coyotes organization, we are very pleased that Glendale City Council voted in favor of keeping the Coyotes in the Valley for the upcoming 2011-12 NHL season. We are grateful to Glendale Mayor Elaine Scruggs, City Manager Ed Beasley and Glendale City Council for their unwavering support. The City of Glendale and the National Hockey League are committed to hockey in Arizona and we will continue to work with NHL Commissioner Gary Bettman, Deputy Commissioner Bill Daly and Mayor Scruggs to find a long-term ownership solution that will keep the Coyotes in Glendale for many years to come.”

– Phoenix Coyotes COO Mike Nealy


Minnesota Wild are currently looking for a new head coach, Star Tribune’s Michael Russo gives us a look at potential candidates.

From Michael Russo (Star Tribune)

The Wild is seeking its third head coach in franchise history, and here is a look at the search so far:
INTERVIEWED

• Former Edmonton coach Craig MacTavish*

OTHER POTENTIAL CANDIDATES
Former NHL head coaches

• Michel Therrien (Pittsburgh, Montreal)

• Ken Hitchcock (Dallas, Philadelphia, Columbus)

• Andy Murray (Los Angeles, St. Louis)

• Pete DeBoer (Florida)

• Scott Gordon (Islanders)

• Guy Carbonneau (Montreal)

Nashville Predators defenseman Shane O’Brien will be an unrestricted free agent this summer. Will he be back in Nashville next season?

From Josh Cooper (The Tennessean)

We’re not saying Shane O’Brien won’t be in Nashville next year. But he sounded like a player who believes he played his last game as a Predator following their Game 6 loss to Vancouver. O’Brien will be an unrestricted free agent this summer. Read his quote and decide for yourself.

“It was a fun year, a lot of great people in this dressing room and in the organization and the fans were great,” O’Brien said. “Who knows what the future holds, but I’ll always remember my time in Nashville. Great teammates, great fans, great city and unfortunately we just came up a little bit short.”

Philadelphia Flyers Ville Leino will be an unrestricted free agent this summer and is expected to command upwards of three million per season.

From Ryan Bright (Philadelphia Sports Daily)

VOORHEES, N.J. — Ville Leino stood in front of the media on Monday, answering questions about his future with the Flyers. Facing unrestricted free agency, his calm attitude and go-with-the-flow personality helped downplay what could be a very uncertain and potentially chaotic offseason for the 27-year old.

“I like it here and it’s fun for me here,” said Leino, who is expected to command upwards of three million per season. “I’ve been enjoying hockey and everybody is good around here, it’s a great hockey organization. Hopefully, I’ll be back here but we’ll see in the summer.”

Ice Edge Holdings withdraws from Phoenix Coyotes deal

From Rebekah Sanders (The Arizona Republic)

Minority-investor group Ice Edge Holdingshas withdrawn from the group led by Chicago trader Matthew Hulsizer that is attempting to buy the Phoenix Coyotes.

Ice Edge was prompted by the vote that the Glendale City Council was set to take late Tuesday, after this story’s publication deadline, on whether to pay the National Hockey League up to $25 million to negotiate to keep the team through the 2011-12 season.

Ice Edge, made up of four East Coast and Canadian businessmen, entered the picture in summer 2009 as a bidder when the hockey team was still in bankruptcy. Months of negotiations followed and Ice Edge became the front-runner to buy the franchise.

Report: Pittsburgh Penguins want to renew ties with Jaromir Jagr.

From NHL.com

The Pittsburgh Penguins reportedly want to re-connect with Jaromir Jagr – regardless of whether that means he wears black and gold next season.

The Penguins reportedly plan to invite Jagr to their annual summer alumni golf outing, which will serve as a reunion for members of the 1991 Stanley Cup championship team. Jagr, the Penguins’ first pick in the 1990 Entry Draft, played for the 1990-91 team as an 18-year-old rookie and scored 27 regular-season goals before adding 13 points in the playoffs.

Jagr, now 39, spent his first 11 seasons with the Penguins before being dealt to Washington and then to the New York Rangers. He has spent the last three years playing in the KHL in Russia, but is without a contract for next season.

Nashville Predators advanced to the second round of this years Stanley Cup playoffs for the first time in franchise history. According to Lyle Richardson, Predators need some scoring help, to take the next step forward.

From Lyle Richardson (Spector)

What’s missing is the last, key piece: scoring.

The Predators did a phenomenal job checking most of the Canucks top scorers – apart from Ryan Kesler – in submission, but they lacked the offensive punch which could’ve turned the series in their favor.

Checking forward Joel Ward, he of the 29 points in 80 games this season, was the Predators leading scorer during their playoff run, with 13 points in 12 games, but that doesn’t mean Nashville has a blossoming scorer on their hands for next season.

Report: Agent of Dallas Stars defenseman Karlis Skrastins is currently negotiating a contract with KHL’s Lokomotiv Yaroslavl

From sovsport.ru (Roughly Translated)

Yaroslavsiky “Locomotive” is active on defense, “Dallas” Karlis Skrastins.

Negotiations between the 36-year-old hockey player and the club management is actively underway. But if Skrastins and put his signature to the agreement, then it will happen no earlier than the first of July 2001, when the completed contract in the NHL and the defender will become an unrestricted free agent.

Tags: Dallas Stars Ice Edge Jaromir Jagr Karlis Skrastins Minnesota Wild Nashville Predators Philadelphia Flyers Phoenix Coyotes Pittsburgh Penguins Shane O’Brien Ville Leino

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